Graduate Student Committee


Sarah Dowman

Dowman, Sarah
PhD Candidate
Spanish Department
Sarah Dowman is a PhD candidate in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese where she focuses on Latin American and U.S. Latina/o cultural studies, gender and sexuality studies, and transnationalism. Her dissertation project is titled “Change Is Sound: Resistance and Activism in Queer Latinx Punk.” Sarah’s conceptualization of punk includes all aspects of the subculture including performance, style and aesthetic, ideologies and activism, and the many cultural products that punx produce such as music, visual art and photography, zines, and other written texts. Sarah hopes to continue to spotlight the important cultural work of queer Latinx punx, still overwhelmingly unnoticed and marginalized within mainstream academia. She also enjoys going to shows, traveling, painting, and spending time with her cat.

Daniela bulanksy

Bulansky, Daniela
PhD Student
Department of Spanish and Portuguese
Daniela Bulansky, originally from Argentina, is a PhD student at the Department of Spanish and Portuguese. She studied political science at the University of Buenos Aires. Before coming to UMD, she worked at FLACSO-Argentina (The Latin American School of Social Sciences) in the gender, society, and policies area, and in CIECTI (Interdisciplinary Centre of Studies in Science, Technology and Innovation). Her academic field of interest is Latin American literature, with special focus on Southern Cone dictatorship and post-dictatorship literature.

Jonathan Brower

Brower, Jonathan
PhD Candidate
Department of History
Jonathan Brower is a doctoral candidate in the History Department. He graduated from the Johns Hopkins University in 2010 with a BA in History and Near Eastern Studies. At the University of Maryland, Jonathan studies the French Revolution, with an emphasis on questions relating to religion, identity and the nation during the Terror. His dissertation argues that the cultural and religious policies of the Terror were actually part of a larger project of nation-building during the French Revolution. Besides his dissertation topic, Jonathan is also interested in questions relating to the transnational experience of revolution in the late-eighteenth and early-nineteenth centuries. Finally, both within and outside academia, Jonathan is passionate about community organizing and labor rights.

Lissette Escariz Ferrá

Escariz Ferrá, Lissette
MA Student
English Department
Born in La Habana del Este, Cuba and moved to the U.S. when she was eight years old. After completing her English B.A. at the University of Florida, she became a middle and high school teacher in Miami, FL, where she taught English and Language Arts. She is currently a graduate student in the English Department at the University of Maryland focusing on Caribbean literature, U.S. multiethnic literature, and critical theory. When she thinks she has spare time, Lissette enjoys dancing Cuban salsa, drawing and painting, taking pictures, and doing crossfit.

Sabrina Gonzalez

Gonzalez, Sabrina
PhD Student
Department of History
Sabrina González is a PhD student in the Department of History. She graduated from Universidad Nacional de La Matanza, in Buenos Aires, Argentina, with a BA in social communication. In her ongoing research, she analyzes anarchist education at the beginning of the twentieth century in Buenos Aires. Interested in education and social movements from her experience as an activist, Sabrina came to the University of Maryland to work towards a PhD in Latin American History. During her first year she was working as a graduate assistant at the Latin American Studies Center and exploring transnational and transdisciplinary perspective in her research.

Victor Hernandez-Sang

Hernandez-Sang, Victor
PhD Student
Enthnomusicology
Víctor Hernández-Sang is a graduate student and teaching assistant of ethnomusicology. His MA thesis explores the processes of folklorization and secularization of palos drums, an African-derived ritual music tradition of the Dominican Republic, which are largely used in the activities of the religion Las Veintiuna Divisiones. His fieldwork research is focused in the northern region of the Dominican Republic. Víctor was born and raised in the Dominican Republic and attended Luther College in Decorah, Iowa, for his undergraduate education where he majored in music (flute performance).

Eben Levy

Levey, Eben
PhD Student
Department of History
Eben Levey is a PhD student in the History Department. He graduated from Vassar College in 2008 with a BA in Urban Studies with a minor in Economics and from Georgetown University in 2013 with an MA in Latin American Studies. He comes to the University of Maryland to work towards a PhD in Latin American History, with a specific emphasis on the social constructions of race and indigeneity in the 20th Century. In particular, Eben proposes to examine the processes of urban development in Southern Mexico and the incorporation of indigenous peoples into the urban setting.

Ana Nadalini Mendes

Mendes, Ana Nadalini
MA Student
History Department
Ana Mendes received her BA and MA in History from the Universidade Federal do Paraná - Brazil in 2005 and 2009. In her MA, she dedicated to the study of sacred food in the Afro-Brazilian religion Candomblé. She comes to the University of Maryland to work towards an MA in early Latin American history, with a specific emphasis in cultural and gender history. She is particularly interested the use of food as an strategy of resistance used by enslaved women in Brazil and United States in the nineteenth century. Ultimately, she would like to pursue an academic history career as a professor and a researcher of history of slavery and history of food.

Ana Ivelisse Sanchez-Rivera

Sanchez-Rivera, Ana Ivelisse
PhD Student
Ana Ivelisse Sanchez-Rivera is a first-generation student from an economically disadvantaged family and she is a product of the public education system. She graduated from the University of Puerto Rico, with a double major in Psychology and Geography. Her undergraduate research was based worked with cognitive processes involved in discrimination based on skin color. She completed her MA in Multicultural Geography at SUNY Binghamton. Her thesis was about how Whitening’s patterns changed by places in PR and the importance of these when identifying xenophobic attitudes against Dominicans living in the Island. She is currently a Ph.D. Candidate at the Geography Department studying how the construction of places influence identity and racial identification".

Cara Snyder

Snyder, Cara
PhD Student
Cara Snyder graduated with a BA from Agnes Scott College, where she double majored in economics and international relations, with a minor in spanish (2009). Before joining the Women’s Studies Department at the University of Maryland, Cara worked as a program assistant in The Americas Program at The Carter Center, as a Fulbright Scholar and English teacher in Brazil, and as an international admissions counselor at Agnes Scott College. She has also participated in a number of training and programs that sit at the intersections of civil society and government. Her previous research, “I’m Chiquita Banana and I’m Here to Stay: US-Latin Relations, Carmen Miranda, and the Role of Cultural Diplomacy in Conflict Prevention,” examined the symbolic deployment of Carmen Miranda as a heuristic device for understanding the successes and failures of cultural diplomacy in US-Brazilian relations. As a graduate student, Cara is interested in feminist economics, sexualization of female athletes, and transnational feminism.

Kristofer Jon Reed

Reed, Kristofer Jon
PhD Student
English Department
Kristofer is a first-year PhD student in the English Department at UMD. His research interests are in the literature of the colonial Americas and US American antebellum literature. He earned his MA in English (Rhetoric and Composition) from the University of South Carolina--Columbia. Animal Studies is an additional area of interest and his current projects include studies of the function and representation of animals in fiction, e.g. Aphra Behn's Oroonoko and Edgar Allan Poe's The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym.

Mariana Nidia Reyes

Reyes, Mariana Nidia
PhD Student
Spanish Department
Born in Chihuahua, México. She has a Masters degree in Spanish literature by the University of Texas at El Paso (2016). While doing her masters she studied the cultural representations of the Ciudad Juárez feminicides, with special focus on theater and the way the victims are portrayed. Now she is a first year student at the Spanish PhD program here at UMCP and is interested in contemporary Mexican literature from the U.S.-México border and the way in which different types of violence are represented. On her spare time she enjoys going to the movies, taking long walks and drinking coffee.