Graduate Student Residents

The Latin American Studies Center (LASC) at the University of Maryland, College Park invites you to apply for a semester-long residency in our H.J. Patterson offices, beginning January 7, 2019. The unpaid residency will be awarded to two students, and includes access to a private desk in an office shared with one other resident, as well as access to our shared kitchen, lounge, meeting room, and work room. The Graduate Residents' research will be featured in a talk or workshop that showcases the work completed during their residency.

All currently enrolled UMD graduate students who are engaged in work focused on Latin America or the Caribbean are qualified to apply. We seek applicants who will contribute vitally to the LASC community. In your 1-page letter of application, please address the following questions:

1. What project do you plan to work on during the residency? How will the use of the LASC offices and proximity to LASC staff benefit your work?

2. How do you envision contributing to the LASC community? If you have been engaged with LASC in the past, describe your involvement. How do you plan to promote LASC's mission?

Send letters of application to LASC Director Dr. Merle Collins at lasc@umd.edu by December 6, 2019.

Residents Spring 2020


Sergio Garcia

Sergio García Mejía
MS Student
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
Sergio Garcia is a Fulbright Scholar from Guatemala. He graduated from Universidad de San Carlos de Guatemala with a BA in Civil Engineering. Currently he is pursuing a Water Resources MSc degree at the University of Maryland, College Park, and is part of the Center for Disaster Resilience at the A. James Clark School of Engineering. His research focuses on the intersection of probabilistic models for disaster assessment in the Northern Triangle of Central America and human migration patterns in the wake of disasters. Sergio has significant experience working in municipal planning in both rural and semi-rural environments in Guatemala. Sergio has also assisted in developing educational projects near Guatemala City's garbage dump and is currently working to design and build a new community development and educational program in the same area. With over a decade of experience as a musician, Sergio has played in several musical groups and participated in various non-profit music projects.

Sabrina González

Sabrina González
PhD Student
Department of History
Sabrina González is a PhD candidate in the Department of History. She graduated from Universidad Nacional de La Matanza, in Buenos Aires, Argentina, with a BA in social communication. Her dissertation entitled: “Schools as Laboratories: Science, Children’s Bodies, and School Reformers in the Making of Modern Argentina (1880-1930)” studies the historical processes by which schoolteachers in South America used education as a tool for emancipation and built a transnational school reform movement that both challenged and contributed to children’s disciplining. In Argentina, she has taught multiple classes at public universities, high schools, and alternative schools for adults. Since 2006, she has been working with social movements as a communicator, educator, and student and labor organizer. At UMD, she tried to bring her previous activism to engage with the Latin American and Latinx community on campus. As an advocate for community building and collective action she co-founded the Latin American Studies Center Writing Group and the LASC Graduate Student Collective, and she served as the co-president of the History Graduate Student Association (2018-2019). After working as a GA for LASC in 2015-2019, Sabrina is excited to come back to LASC offices as a Graduate Resident and keep contributing to the center’s interdisciplinary mission and community building.

Ofelia Montelongo

Ofelia Montelongo
MA Studentt
Ofelia Montelongo is a bilingual writer originally from Mexico. She received a BA in accounting and finance, an MBA, and a BA in English and Creative Writing. Ofelia is a freelance writer and photographer and has collaborated with magazines such as Phoenix New Times, So Scottsdale, and Phoenix Magazine. She led creative writing workshops in Spanish at Palabras Bilingual Bookstore and was the Editor-in-Chief for the journal Superstition Review in the fall of 2016. She taught Spanish at Arizona State University and she is pursuing her MA in Latin American literature at the University of Maryland. Her research interests include Chicano and Latin American literature, theory of translation, borderlands, creative writing, and more. Her work has been published in Latino Book Review, Los Acentos Review, Rio Grande Review, Ponder Review and elsewhere. She is currently reading for Potomac Review and she is the 2019 Writer’s Center Undiscovered Voices Fellow and the PEN America New Voices Fellow.

Residents Fall 2019


Daniela bulanksy

Bulansky, Daniela
PhD Student
Department of Spanish and Portuguese
Daniela Bulansky, originally from Argentina, is a PhD student at the Department of Spanish and Portuguese. She studied political science at the University of Buenos Aires. Before coming to UMD, she worked at FLACSO-Argentina (The Latin American School of Social Sciences) in the gender, society, and policies area, and in CIECTI (Interdisciplinary Centre of Studies in Science, Technology and Innovation). Her academic field of interest is Latin American literature, with special focus on Southern Cone dictatorship and post-dictatorship literature.

Rodrigo Dominguez-Martinez

Rodrigo Dominguez-Martinez
PhD Sociology

Rodrigo Dominguez-Martinez (Rod Martinez) is an instructor and doctoral student in the Department of Sociology. Previously, Rod was a master's student, as well as instructor in the Center for Nonprofit and NGO Studies at Northern Illinois University. At the University of Maryland, he is an affiliate of the Critical Race Initiative, Maryland Population Research Center, and the Lab for Applied Social Science Research (LASSR). He is also a member of the graduate student editorial team for Contexts Magazine. Rod is currently a Perez Fellow and works with several organizations focused on Boys and Men of Color, Juvenile Justice, and Violence Prevention; among others. His broader research interests include social inequality, the carceral state, race, gender, and social movements. As a Fall 2019 LASC resident, he will present some of his work and develop workshops on these issues. Rod's self-care regimen includes listening to rap at very high decibels, finding good vegetarian food spots, working out, and community building.



Residents Spring 2019


Natasha N. Piñeiros

Natasha N. Piñeiros
MA Student
Student Affairs
Natasha N. Piñeiros was born and raised in Quito, Ecuador until 2009 when her family relocated to the United States. As a first-generation immigrant and first-generation college student, Natasha began her undergraduate career at Bergen Community College in New Jersey where she found her love for the field of student affairs and higher education. She later transferred to The College of New Jersey (TCNJ) where she earned a Bachelor's degree in Communication Studies and Spanish Language. Natasha is currently pursuing her master's degree in Student Affairs at the University of Maryland, College Park, where she worked as an academic advisor and now works as a graduate assistant in the Adele H. Stamp Student Union, supporting the operation of over 900 student organizations. Natasha is passionate about using her career and position in higher education to serve low-income, first-generation, students of color as they navigate their journey in college. Her current research interests include learning about the retention and persistence of Latinx students in Hispanic-serving community colleges. Natasha is bilingual in Spanish and English, and could use some practice on her American Sign Language proficiency. When she is not in a classroom, you can find Natasha dancing, eating sushi, and traveling.

Kristofer Jon Reed

Kristofer Jon Reed
PhD Student
English Department
Kristofer Jon Reed is a third year PhD student in the Department of English. He studies hemispheric literature of the nineteenth century with the aim of challenging the ethnocentric thinking that places the United States and the English language at the center of "American" literature. Kristofer is also interested in posthumanism and the non-human in literature, especially animals.

Lisa Warren Carney

Lisa Warren Carney
PhD Candidate
Spanish Department
Lisa W. Carney is a PhD candidate in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese. Her soon-to-be completed dissertation is 'In Dreams Awake': Truth and Knowledge in Quichua Dream Narratives. Lisa's research focuses on Indigenous cultural production, Andean and Amazonian literature, and concerns of translatability with indigenous and oral texts.



Residents Fall 2018


Victor Hernandez-Sang

Hernandez-Sang, Victor
PhD Student
Enthnomusicology
Victor is a Ph.D. student of ethnomusicology originally from the Dominican Republic. His doctoral project examines the performance of gaga (Haitian-Dominican music and dance) and explores race, immigration, and racial discrimination in the Dominican Republic. At the University of Maryland, he also worked toward his masters degree and his thesis focuses on the performance of palos music in fiestas de misterios in the Dominican Republic. In summer 2018, he started working on his doctoral project conducting field research with the support of the Graduate School Summer Research Fellowship. Before coming to UMD, he received his B.A. from Luther College, Decorah, IA in music (flute performance) and taught flute, ear training, and English in his hometown, Santiago. Victor has contributed to the LASC annual student conference since 2016 as a presenter and member of the organizing committee.

Analia Gomez Vidal

Gomez-Vidal, Analia
PhD Candidate
Department of Government
Analia Gomez-Vidal is the Coordinator for CIDCM and the Program Coordinator for MIDCM since Fall 2014. She is currently a PhD student in the Department of Government and Politics at University of Maryland, College Park. Before moving to Maryland, she has worked for the Fulbright Commission in Buenos Aires, Argentina and for the Ibero-American Federation of Stock Exchanges (FIAB). As a journalist, her articles on politics and economic development have been published in online and printed media. She has also had experience as research consultant for Inter-American Development Bank (IDB). She has previously pursued her M.A. in International Studies and her B.A. in Economics with minor in Journalism at Universidad Torcuato di Tella in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Her research agenda focuses on political economy and gender, with special interest in individual behavior, social network analysis, and experimental design.



Residents Spring 2018


Cara Snyder

Snyder, Cara
PhD Candidate
Department of Women's Studies
Cara Knaub Snyder is a PhD Candidate in Women's Studies and a College of Arts and Humanities Fellow. Prior to joining UMD, Cara was a fulbright scholar in Brazil, an admissions counselor at Agnes Scott College, and a program assistant in the Americas Program at the Carter Center. Her research, which examines gender (non)conformity and queerness, transnational feminisms, and race through the lens of Brazilian futebol (soccer), has been published in Women's Studies Quarterly, Ada: A Journal of Gender, New Media and Technology, and Space and Society.

Sarah Dowman

Dowman, Sarah
PhD Candidate
Spanish Department
Sarah Dowman is a PhD candidate in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese where she focuses on Latin American and U.S. Latina/o cultural studies, gender and sexuality studies, and transnationalism. Her dissertation project is titled “Change Is Sound: Resistance and Activism in Queer Latinx Punk.” Sarah’s conceptualization of punk includes all aspects of the subculture including performance, style and aesthetic, ideologies and activism, and the many cultural products that punx produce such as music, visual art and photography, zines, and other written texts. Sarah hopes to continue to spotlight the important cultural work of queer Latinx punx, still overwhelmingly unnoticed and marginalized within mainstream academia. She also enjoys going to shows, traveling, painting, and spending time with her cat.